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Bookcase: A Mission and a Must-Read

Tuesday September 30, 2008
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Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Fight Terrorism and Build Nations ... One School at a Time by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin

Fighting terror with books is something Mortenson, a former emergency nurse and top-flight mountaineer, believes in. The story starts like any other: “One day in 1993, Mortenson wandered lost and alone after a failed attempt to climb Pakistan's K2, the world's deadliest peak.” But then the story takes an unexpected turn.

Physically emaciated and emotionally drained, Mortenson was rescued by a group of men from an impoverished village and nursed back to health. There, he made a promise to the people: He would return one day and set up schools for young Muslims — mainly girls — in that remote part of the world. Today, as the director of the nonprofit Central Asia Institute, Mortenson has built 55 schools that serve Pakistan's and Afghanistan's poorest communities.

Mortenson's book, written with the help of award-winning journalist Relin, is a spellbinding account of the incredible accomplishments of one man in a region where Americans are feared and sometimes hated. In pursuit of his goal, Mortenson survives an armed kidnapping, repeated death threats, and separations from his wife and children. Three Cups of Tea is an unforgettable and inspiring story of how one man is changing the world — one school at a time.

Published by the Penguin Group
$15.00 (paperback)



The Little Diabetes Book You Need to Read by Michael A. Weiss and Martha M. Funnell, RN, MS

In the United States alone, tens of millions of people are afflicted with diabetes — and scores of millions more are directly affected by the disease, either as family members or friends. Despite the overwhelming statistics, little has been published to help patients with synthesizing complicated information on diabetes — until now.

Most diabetic manuals focus on treating the disease instead of addressing the reality of living with it. The Little Diabetes Book, a compact 250-page guide, spotlights the patient, rather than the many facets of the disease. Weiss has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 20 years, while Funnell, a diabetic educator since 1983, is recognized as a pioneer in the empowerment approach to diabetes education and care.

The Little Diabetes Book presents strategies that enable readers to make informed choices when it comes to managing their diabetes. The text is printed in an easy-to-read font in plain, nonmedical language for readers of all levels. The chapters, which are divided into three different sections — Learning, Doing, and Now What — are a “must read” for both newly diagnosed patients and those who have struggled with diabetes for years. This book is the missing piece in empowering patients with diabetes and their families with critical information to manage their lives.

Running Press
$12.95 (paperback)



Terry Ratner, RN, MFA, is a freelance writer. E-mail Bookcase@nurseweek.com.