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What do you think about my employer “losing” my letter of resignation then charging me with job abandonment?

Wednesday January 11, 2012
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Question:

Dear Nancy,

I submitted a letter of resignation before leaving a community hospital last June. Last month I found out they conveniently lost my letter and charged me with job abandonment. Now I'm on their do-not-rehire list. This looks bad to future employers. I worked there for two years. Can you offer any advice?

Harriet



Nancy Brent replies:

Dear Harriet,

It is unfortunate that your letter of resignation "got lost" and that this has resulted in the difficulties you are now experiencing. Perhaps the "do-not-rehire" status for this facility is a blessing, since it does not sound like your leaving would allow you to return to a position that would be rewarding to you under any circumstances.

The job abandonment allegation is another unfortunate situation for you, especially in view of future employers being told this if they contact your former employer, which most certainly will happen. The way to deal with these unfortunate developments is to be truthful with potential employers and tell them about the letter of resignation you did write, that somehow it "got lost," and that the subsequent allegation is not true.

One positive thing about this string of events is that you now know the lesson of always making a copy of any document you give to an employer upon resigning, or, for that matter, upon any incident of importance that later may be challenged by a current or former employer. Just as documenting your patient care is important, so is documenting your personal business matters.

Sincerely,
Nancy




Nancy J. Brent, RN, MS, JD, is an attorney in private practice in Wilmette, Ill. This information is for educational purposes only and is not intended as legal or any other advice. The reader is encouraged to seek the advice of an attorney or other professional when an opinion is needed.