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I would like to pursue a nursing degree, but don't know if it would be better at my age, to become an LPN then do a bridge program to become an RN. What do you recommend?

Thursday December 13, 2012
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Question:

Dear Donna,

I am 48 years old. Twenty years ago I took some community college classes toward nursing. I would like to pursue a nursing degree, but don't know if it would be better at my age to become an LPN then do a bridge program to become an RN. Or should I just forget it altogether due to my age? What do you recommend?

Wants to Pursue Nursing

Dear Donna replies:

Dear Wants to Pursue Nursing,

At the very young age of 48, you absolutely can and should pursue becoming an RN. Many people are coming into nursing in their 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond. My advice is to get right into a BSN program. The BSN is becoming the standard for all nurses across the country and will be even more so by the time you graduate. Some people might advise you to get an ADN and then bridge to the BSN, but that advice is becoming outdated in an increasingly competitive job market and increasingly complex healthcare environment.

It is said that when folks are on their deathbeds, they never regret the things they did, only the things they didn't do. It's important for you to finish what you started so many years ago and fulfill your mission on this earth. Just do it.

Here are a few articles you may find helpful: “Success strategies for students” (news.Nurse.com/article/20120411/STUDENT/304110009) and “Master the scholarship game” www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/ScholarshipGame.

Best wishes,
Donna


Donna Cardillo, RN, MA, well-known career guru, is Nurse.com’s “Dear Donna” and author of “Your First Year as a Nurse: Making the Transition from Total Novice to Successful Professional” and “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses: Practical Advice for Thriving at Every Stage of Your Career.” Information about the books is available at www.Nurse.com/CE/7010 and www.Nurse.com/CE/7250, respectively. To ask Donna your question, go to www.Nurse.com/Asktheexperts/Deardonna. Find a “Dear Donna” seminar near you: Call 800-866-0919 or visit http://Events.nursingspectrum.com/Seminar.