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After submitting many applications, I have four PRN job offers. Is it worth it for me to take three of them and work my schedule around them?

Friday June 21, 2013
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Question:

Dear Donna,

I'm a new graduate looking for a job. After submitting applications everywhere that is hiring in my area, I've had four interviews and four offers. All four are PRN positions on different shifts — I'm wondering if it's worth it to take as many as three of them and try to work my schedule around them. The four positions are on a med/surg unit, at a nursing home, a home health hospice facility and at a surgical center. I'm not sure what I'm expected to be able to handle, or even where to start.

Multiple Offers

Dear Donna replies:

Dear Multiple Offers,

Four job offers is great, but also confounding as you have discovered. I suggest you accept maybe two, depending on the following considerations:

• How many hours/shifts does each anticipate you might be offered? (Some hospital PRN nurses work almost full time.)

• Which ones offer the most comprehensive new nurse orientation and ongoing support?

• Which of the specialties/employers/shifts are you most interested and excited about?

• Where eventually might you like to work full time, based on specialty, schedule and employer?

• Where do you see the greatest opportunity to learn and grow as a new nurse?

• Which employers do you get the best feeling about, based on the people, the interview experience and opportunities offered?

As a new nurse, or any nurse, it is not a good idea to spread yourself too thin or in too many different directions. Use the criteria above to choose the one or two positions that best suit you.

In the meantime, read “New nurse, new job strategies” (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/Strategies) — take the advice there, including joining and participating in your state or national chapter of the American Nurses Association (www.nursingworld.org). It is vital you immerse yourself in the nursing community to support your current and future career.

Best wishes,
Donna


Donna Cardillo, RN, MA, well-known career guru, is Nurse.com’s “Dear Donna” and author of “Your First Year as a Nurse: Making the Transition from Total Novice to Successful Professional” and “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses: Practical Advice for Thriving at Every Stage of Your Career.” Information about the books is available at www.Nurse.com/CE/7010 and www.Nurse.com/CE/7250, respectively. To ask Donna your question, go to www.Nurse.com/Asktheexperts/Deardonna. Find a “Dear Donna” seminar near you: Call 800-866-0919 or visit http://Events.nursingspectrum.com/Seminar.