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Where can a Spanish nurse, newly licensed in U.S. but with little experience, find a permanent position?

Monday June 16, 2014
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Question:

Dear Donna,

I am a Spanish nurse, and I just got my license here in the U.S. I don't have much experience and am looking for a hospital position. I have a master's degree in critical care, but little experience in the field. Where can I start looking for a
permanent position?

Spanish Nurse

Dear Donna replies:

Dear Spanish Nurse,

The hospital job market for all nurses, new or experienced, is changing. The main reason is care if shifting out of the hospital and into alternative inpatient settings such as long-term care, sub-acute and rehab or into home care, the community, the ambulatory care setting and so on. Along with this shift in care, the jobs are shifting out of the hospital and into alternative settings.

What that means is many hospitals are only hiring nurses with very recent hospital experience. Some are hiring very few brand new nurses or none at all.

The fact that you are bilingual/Spanish will work in your favor to both hospital and nonhospital jobs depending on where you live in the U.S. Besides hospital positions, I encourage you to look for positions in outpatient hemodialysis, hospice, home care and cancer care centers.

Be sure to join and become active in the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (www.nahnnet.org) or the ANA (www.nursingworld.org) for help and support on landing your first job in the U.S. Networking is known to be a great way to find a job and get hired into a good job.

Even though you're not a new nurse, you may find this article helpful “New nurse, new job strategies” (www.Nurse.com/Cardillo/Strategies). You also will be able to get acclimated to the job market and self-marketing expectations in the U.S. by reading my book, “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses.” Many nurses who were educated outside of the U.S. also find it helpful to read the book, “Your 1st Year as a Nurse — Making the Transition from Total Novice to Successful Professional.” Both books are available everywhere books are sold.

Best wishes,
Donna


Donna Cardillo, RN, MA, well-known career guru, is Nurse.com’s “Dear Donna” and author of “Your First Year as a Nurse: Making the Transition from Total Novice to Successful Professional” and “The ULTIMATE Career Guide for Nurses: Practical Advice for Thriving at Every Stage of Your Career.” Information about the books is available at www.Nurse.com/CE/7010 and www.Nurse.com/CE/7250, respectively. To ask Donna your question, go to www.Nurse.com/Asktheexperts/Deardonna. Find a “Dear Donna” seminar near you: Call 800-866-0919 or visit http://www. Nurse.com/Events.