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ONE NJ annual conference calls nurses into action

Monday May 28, 2012
ONE NJ members, from left, include President-elect Pat Steingall, RN, vice president/CNO, Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, N.J.; President Linda Geisler, RN, vice president, patient services, CentraState Healthcare System, Freehold, N.J.; past President Deanna Sperling, RN, COO, Barnabas Health Behavioral Health Network; and Susan Cholewka, executive director, New Jersey Hospital Association.
ONE NJ members, from left, include President-elect Pat Steingall, RN, vice president/CNO, Hunterdon Medical Center, Flemington, N.J.; President Linda Geisler, RN, vice president, patient services, CentraState Healthcare System, Freehold, N.J.; past President Deanna Sperling, RN, COO, Barnabas Health Behavioral Health Network; and Susan Cholewka, executive director, New Jersey Hospital Association.
(Photos by Janice Petrella Lynch, RN)
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Patrick Coonan, RN, dean and professor at Adelphi University School of Nursing in Garden City, N.Y., left, and Connie Vance, RN, professor at The College of New Rochelle (N.Y.), speak to nurse leaders at the 2012 ONE NJ annual conference.
With more than 200 nurse leaders in attendance, the Organization of Nurse Executives of New Jersey highlighted "Nursing Leadership: Engage, Connect, Transform" throughout the 2012 annual meeting and conference April 26-27 at the Ocean Place Resort & Spa in Long Branch, N.J.

"ONE NJís vision is to transform the future of healthcare in New Jersey through innovative nursing leadership. The ONE NJ is an inclusive, collaborative and proactive nursing organization," said Linda Geisler, RN, MSN, NEA-BC, FACHE, president of ONE NJ and vice president of patient care services at CentraState Healthcare System in Freehold, N.J.

As co-leader of the stateís action coalition, Edna Cadmus, RN, PhD, NEA-BC, clinical professor and director of the nursing leadership program at Rutgers University College of Nursing, discussed the first yearís progress in New Jersey.

The scope-of-practice pillar completed a list of challenges and opportunities; identified an assembly and senate champion to help move key legislation; worked with legislative sponsors to amend bills that add or enhance the role of nurses; and recommended nurses be participants in the creation of electronic health records. The education pillar has developed a residency model framework for new RNs and is working to develop pilots on academic progression for nurse competencies. The leadership pillar has increased the number of nurses on boards, and the data pillar has completed a survey nationally to identify key data sets to measure workforce supply and demand needs. A transforming practice pillar has been added to highlight the work of nurses on the IOM recommendations.

Today and tomorrow

Connie Vance, RN, EdD, FAAN, professor of The College of New Rochelle (N.Y.), discussed nine possibilities in power mentoring for todayís leaders, highlighting the moment mentor, for those who need support for a brief time and the peer mentor, for those who can establish a fruitful and often joyful relationship with their colleagues.

"Every nurse needs and deserves the gift of mentoring — as mentor and protege," Vance said. "To measure intelligence, achievement and success, consider mentor intelligence as the capacity for entering into mentoring relationships, along with multiple intelligences, cognitive intelligence and emotional intelligence." She identified three competencies in mentor intelligence to be mentoring mentality, or knowing; mentoring lens, or seeing; and mentoring momentum, or doing.

Looking to the future, Patrick Coonan, RN, EdD, MPA, NEA-BC, FACHE, dean and professor at Adelphi University School of Nursing in Garden City, N.Y., identified the need and urgency for nursing leaders to implement succession management, the process by which business leaders ensure they have the right successors in the right place at the right time.

"We have to build bench strength for key roles; fewer staff means fewer potential leaders; and we canít just talk about it, we need to do it," Coonan said.

Compared to a benchmark, those who have been successful in succession management have high-performing talent in pivotal roles, quick processes to successfully place superior talent in key positions, a strong line of successors, effective processes for managing succession, effective acceleration of development and readiness, and retention of critical talent, he added.

Inspirational speakers Steven Duncanson, president of True Destiny Communications, and Greg Nelson, president of G.D. Nelson, challenged nurse leaders to connect on a deeper level and reach to the core of accountability.

For information about ONE NJ, visit www.NJHA.com/ONENJ.


Janice Petrella Lynch, RN, MSN, is a regional reporter. Send letters to editorNJ@nurse.com or post a comment below.