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UMSON teams with others to improve healthcare in Rwanda

Monday October 8, 2012
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The University of Maryland School of Nursing in Baltimore is teaming up with nursing, medical and public health colleges and universities to assist the government of Rwanda in strengthening its healthcare system, according to a news release. UMSON is one of 13 U.S. institutions of higher learning taking part in this effort. After a competitive recruiting campaign, UMSON is sending seven faculty members to Rwanda to assist with the healthcare efforts.

Through the Human Resources for Health Program, an initiative led by Rwanda’s Ministry of Health and facilitated by the support of the Clinton Health Access Initiative, a seven-year plan is in place. During this period, the HRH program will address Rwanda’s critical shortage of medical, nursing and dental workers; poor quality of education in the health professions; poor infrastructure; and the inadequate management of health facilities. The U.S. government is funding the project through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Rwanda’s government will manage the HRH program, contracting with the U.S. schools directly. Participating schools will not charge any general overheads to this program. Additionally, U.S. faculty will live and work in Rwanda for at least 11 months.

"Having spent almost two years in Rwanda, I am so pleased to see the University of Maryland’s engagement in this important work," Marik Moen, RN, MS, assistant professor at UMSON and U.S. Rwandan project coordinator, said in the release. "The effort to renovate nursing education and practice is fundamentally important, insightful and an honorable investment. Everyone involved will set the stage for transforming how nursing, midwifery, medicine, dentistry and public health are taught, learned and practiced. In addition, we are developing a new paradigm for global partnerships to address human resources for health."


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