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Barnabas event features engaged learning

Monday October 22, 2012
After
After "arriving" in the ED, Community Medical Center staff, from left, Lynda Smith, security; Brian Vogt, RN, ED staff nurse; Deb Saunders, RN, rapid response team nurse; and Cory Fisher, RT, respiratory department, transferred the patient from the wheelchair to a stretcher and began their assessment. Missing from the photo is Aparna Mandal, MD.
(Photo by Janice Petrella Lynch, RN)
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Assessing the patientís status is the winning team from Newark Beth Israel ED, from left, Joseph Kotora, DO, staff physician, emergency medicine, and fellow in emergency medical services and disaster medicine; Cresencia Daquipil, RN, ED staff nurse; Adam OíMara, DO, resident, emergency medicine; and Garrett Norman, MD, resident, emergency medicine.
(Photos by Janice Petrella Lynch, RN)
Five members of the ED staff from Newark (N.J.) Beth Israel Medical Center and five staff members from the Community Medical Center, Toms River, N.J., competed in the final round of a Barnabas Health SimWARS program Oct. 8 at Saint Barnabas Medical Center in Livingston, N.J.

More than 85 RNs and other healthcare professionals from the stateís acute care facilities and universities watched as the two teams each responded separately to a high-technology simulator "patient" who arrived in the ED in critical condition.

Both teams demonstrated their ability to assess the patientís condition, gather and interpret the data, and think quickly on their feet to make decisions about the appropriate diagnosis and treatment plan. In debriefing sessions after completion of each of the scenarios, the teams discussed with a panel of three judges the importance of cross talk, teamwork, clinical decision making and family feedback during the event.

Because the mannequin can simulate symptoms such as bleeding, cyanosis, pupillary reaction and abnormal heart and abdominal sounds, the scenarios can replicate a variety of clinical conditions, including sudden cardiac arrest, increased intracranial pressure and traumatic amputations.

The sim center at SBMC accommodates two simulated patients at a time and is equipped with a state-of-the-art audio-visual recording system, a debriefing/conference space, sim room and control room. It was initially developed for perinatal safety programs, and with that goal in mind the team implemented an obstetrical crisis management program for teams from the Barnabas system and other hospitals in the state.


Jared M. Kutzin, RN, director, SBMC simulation center, at left, and Cathlyn Robinson, RN, clinical nurse educator, ED, SBMC, coordinated the Barnabas Health SimWARS program.
(Photos by Janice Petrella Lynch, RN)
"We have quickly grown, and our center now provides resident physician skills training programs, code team training, OR team training, and in-situ process-improvement programs," said Jared M. Kutzin, RN, DNP, MPH, director, SBMC Regional Perinatal Simulation Center, who said he would like to see the development of a center that could be shared among hospitals, nursing schools, medical schools and allied health programs.

In January, the center developed a collaborative program with Seton Hall University College of Nursing, South Orange, N.J.; Felician College, Division of Nursing and Health Management, Lodi, N.J.; UMDNJ School of Health Related Professions, Scotch Plains, N.J.; and clinical faculty from the UMDNJ and St. Georgeís schools of medicine in which students from different health professions learn with one another in the simulation environment.

"It is all about everyone learning to work together in providing safe patient care, and we are proud to say that this past year we have had more than 500 learners take part in our simulation-based programs," Kutzin said.

Also included in the program was Alan Cooper, PhD, MBA, chairman, Society for Simulation in Healthcare Education committee and president/CEO, Tudor Group, who discussed the shift in the educational paradigm from passive to engaged learner in simulation instruction, and Amanda Burden, MD, assistant professor of anesthesiology, Cooper University Hospital, and director of simulation, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University in Camden, N.J., who presented evidence in support of simulation as a teaching tool and in assessing competencies.

Cooper and Burden served on the judging panel along with Anthony Slonim, MD, DrPH, executive vice president and chief medical officer, Barnabas Health.

Janice Petrella Lynch, RN, MSN, is a regional nurse executive.


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