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AACN conference attendees take in new 'NURSES’ film

Sunday May 26, 2013
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A documentary about the complex world of nursing reached its largest audience when thousands of nurses attended a screening May 22 during the annual conference of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

The documentary, "NURSES, If Florence Could See Us Now," was shown in Boston at AACN’s National Teaching Institute & Critical Care Exposition, the world’s largest conference for nurses who care for high-acuity and critically ill patients. Registration for the conference exceeded 7,000 nurses.

The event was sponsored by AACN, with support from Drexel University Online, and On Nursing Excellence, the nonprofit organization that produced the film to highlight and show appreciation for the extraordinary work nurses do every day.

"We are proud to share this powerful documentary with our attendees as AACN celebrates 40 years at the forefront of critical care nursing education through our renowned national conference," Ramón Lavandero, RN, MA, MSN, FAAN, senior director at AACN, said in a news release.

The provocative film celebrated its official release April 30. DVD copies of the documentary were available to each NTI attendee. The movie also is available for private purchase.

Conceived and directed by Kathy Douglas, RN, MHA, the CEO of On Nursing Excellence and CNO at API Healthcare, the documentary offers a rare look into nurses’ exciting and challenging world from the bedside to the boardroom.

A former critical care nurse, Douglas was on hand during the NTI screening to discuss how her personal experience with cancer compelled her to pay homage to her lifelong profession by telling nurses’ story through their own voices.

"During this time of healthcare transformation, one of our goals in producing this film is to provide leaders, policymakers and the public with a better understanding of nursing’s impact and value," Douglas said.

More than 120 nurses across the United States were interviewed for the film, providing a close-up look at the profession and incorporating the many roles nurses play and the lives they touch. There was no advanced scripting or prepping for the documentary, which consists of authentic and candid conversations between Douglas and her interview subjects.

See a trailer and learn more about the film: www.nursesthemovie.com.


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