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Miami Childrenís Hospital welcomes princess and kidsí camp makes a splash

Wednesday June 12, 2013
From left, Erika Pruss-Schmitz, RN, MBA, MSW, CPN, PICU nurse manager; Princess Zein bint Al Hussein of Jordan; and Erika Vila, RN, DNP, MCH Heart Program nursing director
From left, Erika Pruss-Schmitz, RN, MBA, MSW, CPN, PICU nurse manager; Princess Zein bint Al Hussein of Jordan; and Erika Vila, RN, DNP, MCH Heart Program nursing director
(Photos courtesy of Miami Children's Hospital)
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Jordanís Princess Zein bint Al Hussein visited Miami Childrenís Hospital on March 5 and toured the hospital to learn about some of the MCH programs, according to a news release. Her group was given a demonstration of MCHís telehealth program and also toured the cardiac ICU, which provides highly specialized pre- and postop care for children undergoing cardiac surgery and interventional catheterization. A private reception and facility tour also was held at the Michael Fux Family Center.


In other news, the hospital hosted its annual Ventilation Assisted Childrenís Camp March 23-29, which included a March 26 trip to Nikkie Beach for ventilation assisted children and their families. Now in its 27th year, VACC camp has hosted about 150 children representing more than 20 states and countries. The camp is free and is open to children ages five and older. Medical care is provided around the clock by volunteer medical staff.


Participants included a 15-year-old from Ohio who visited the beach for the first time in her life, a camper from New York who has been attending VACC camp for 10 years with his family, and a 7-year old from South Florida who now helps to raise funds for the camp.

Nurses, physicians and volunteers donate their time for the weeklong camp. Miami Beach Fire Rescue set up wheelchair paths over the sandy beach for the children, and a special "waterproof" wheelchair helped patients enjoy the water. Special hand-held ventilators enabled children who are ventilator-dependent to breathe without their devices while in the water.


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