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Quality summit helps cut preventable cases of VTE at Methodist Health System

Monday July 1, 2013
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Methodist Health System reduced the number of hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism occurrences last year after implementing several strategies across the system. During a quality summit, in which best practices for improving patient safety, quality and core measures at the systemís four hospitals were shared, a team outlined the measures taken to reduce the number of patients who experience VTEs at Methodist Dallas Medical Center.

A systemwide team consisting of nursing staff, physicians and pharmacy and quality improvement staff was then formed to develop an approach to VTE assessment and physician orders. The team created assessment tools, educational opportunities for physicians and nursing staff and a standard physician order system. It also began to audit and review all cases of hospital-acquired VTE in a multidisciplinary committee, referring cases back for peer review when necessary. As a result, in 2012, the VTE team identified only two potentially preventable cases of VTE.

"The stories presented at our quality summit speak volumes to Methodistís culture of continuous quality improvement," said Methodist Health System Chief Medical Officer Adam Myers, MD, said in a news release. "It is not just the stuff of strategic plans and committee meetings. It is frontline staff identifying opportunities, determining root causes, exploring options for improvement, implementing creative solutions and continuously monitoring to sustain performance."

Past quality summits have resulted in other systemwide improvements, such as crew resource training for high risk obstetrical cases and a significant reduction in the number of patients who experience hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, according to the release.

"I am so proud of each of our hospitals, their leadership, caregivers and staff who have consistently pushed for 'perfect care,í" Pamela Stoyanoff, Methodistís executive vice president and chief operating officer, said in a news release. "Their efforts are recognized in our outstanding core measures scores."

Recent data from HealthInsights shows that Methodist Health System hospitals rank among the top in the Metroplex and the country for meeting core measures, according to a news release. Methodist Mansfield ranks in the 97th percentile in the country, Methodist Dallas 90%, Methodist Charlton 83%, and Methodist Richardson 84%.

For information, visit MethodistHealthSystem.org.


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