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Marymount University school of health professions receives grant to support nursing simulation laboratory

Tuesday July 30, 2013
Arminda Liston, right, who is in Marymountís accelerated, second-degree BSN program, assists Deborah Smith, RN, the simulation lab instructor, with a simulated birth.
Arminda Liston, right, who is in Marymountís accelerated, second-degree BSN program, assists Deborah Smith, RN, the simulation lab instructor, with a simulated birth.
(Photos courtesy of Marymount University)
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Amaura Cope, left, presents the "mother" with her newborn as Deborah Smith, RN, the simulation lab instructor, looks on.
Marymount Universityís Malek School of Health Professions in Arlington, Va., now has state-of-the-art simulation laboratories. The pregnant mother and baby robot simulators are the newest tools with which students can learn how to handle medical situations.

Their purchase was made possible by a $54,000 grant from CareFirst/Blue Cross and Blue Shield.

"Working with the simulators is invaluable since students mostly observe in labor and delivery clinicals," Deborah Smith, RN, MSN, CNM, the simulation lab instructor, said in a news release.

"Here they are hands-on. We also have them go through the patient history and records to outline possible complications so that they can anticipate and plan what to do in different situations."

In class, the students might deal with a "mother" who is Rh-negative, has gestational diabetes and is group B strep positive. They might assist with the birth of a large baby with shoulder dystocia or cope with an emergency early-term birth.

"We see the worst-case scenarios here Ė things that we wonít necessarily experience in the hospital," Arminda Liston, who is in the accelerated, second-degree nursing program, said in the release.

"We see and learn about situations and maneuvers I hadnít even heard about or seen. So I feel better prepared should I encounter them in real life."

Working through cases with the simulators helps students to learn and practice skills in a safe environment.

"Itís about not freaking out Ė staying calm while in emergency mode," Smith said in the release. "You want to explain the situation calmly to the mother."


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