FAQContact usTerms of servicePrivacy Policy

City of Hope RN helps author new IOM cancer report

Monday December 9, 2013
Betty Ferrell, RN
Betty Ferrell, RN
Printer Icon
line
Select Text Size: Zoom In Zoom Out
line
Comment
Share this Nurse.com Article
rss feed
Betty Ferrell, RN, PhD, FAAN, a research scientist at the City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, Calif., was one of three nurses on a committee of healthcare professionals to author “Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis,” a new report by the Institute of Medicine, according to a news release.

Delivery of cancer care in the U.S. is facing a crisis stemming from a combination of factors — a growing demand for such care, a shrinking oncology work force, rising costs of cancer care, and the complexity of the disease and its treatment, according to the report. It also recommends ways to respond to these challenges and improve cancer care delivery, including by strengthening clinicians’ core competencies in caring for patients with cancer, shifting to team-based models of care and communicating more effectively with patients.

The report, released in September, updates the 1999 IOM report “Ensuring Quality Cancer Care.” Members of the committee discussed the group’s findings and conclusions and answered questions duiring a public webinar Sept. 10.

Approximately 14 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with cancer and more than 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed each year. By 2022, it is projected there will be 18 million cancer survivors in the U.S., and by 2030, cancer incidence is expected to rise to 2.3 million, according to the release.

For more information, visit IOM.edu/Reports/2013/Delivering-High-Quality-Cancer-Care-Charting-a-New-Course-for-a-System-in-Crisis.aspx

Some report statistics

Approximately 14 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with cancer and more than 1.6 million new cases are diagnosed each year. By 2022, it is projected there will be 18 million cancer survivors in the U.S., and by 2030, cancer incidence is expected to rise to 2.3 million, according to the release.

For more on the IOM report, visit http://www.IOM.edu/Reports/2013/Delivering-High-Quality-Cancer-Care-Charting-a-New-Course-for-a-System-in-Crisis.aspx