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Children’s National RN earns Magnet Nurse of the Year in Empirical Outcomes

Monday December 9, 2013
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For her work at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C., Elizabeth Mikula, RN, MSN, CPN, has received the 2013 Magnet Nurse of the Year Award in Empirical Outcomes.

The National Magnet Nurse of the Year Awards are presented annually by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. The awards recognize outstanding contributions by clinical nurses working in Magnet designated hospitals in each of five Magnet Model component areas.

“Elizabeth is a strong advocate for the nursing profession and for advancing the health and well-being of children everywhere,” Linda Talley, RN, MS, BSN, NE-BC, vice president and CNO at Children’s National, said in a news release. “Her research and leadership on behalf of pediatric nurses helped spark a worldwide advocacy campaign for the health screening of infants for congenital heart disease at the earliest possible stages of life.”

Mikula joined Children’s National in 2006, becoming clinical program coordinator for cardiac research in 2011. For the Children’s National Congenital Heart Disease Screening Program, she coordinated research efforts around the use of pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart disease in the newborn nursery. She is a frequent speaker and author of several publications on the topic. She co-authored — with Gerard Martin, MD, senior vice president of the Children’s National Center for Heart, Lung and Kidney Disease, and others — new 2013 recommendations published in Pediatrics on CCHD screening for all newborns. She has been a Magnet Champion co-leader and was an active contributor to the 2010 submission leading to Magnet designation for Children’s National.

“Elizabeth’s work for the Congenital Heart Disease Screening Program has taken what was a solid program and helped to turn our CCHD program into a successful public health campaign educating healthcare professionals, new and expecting parents, as well as policymakers,” Martin said in the release.


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