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Former State Sen. Bill Emmerson joins CHA leadership team January 1

Friday December 27, 2013
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Former State Sen. Bill Emmerson has been appointed senior vice president of state relations and advocacy for the California Hospital Association, according to a news release.

Emmerson, who was first elected to the Assembly in 2004 representing Riverside and San Bernardino counties, announced his resignation from the state Senate in November and will join the CHA effective Jan. 1.

“Bill is among the most respected and thoughtful leaders that I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with,” CHA President/CEO C. Duane Dauner said in a news release. “He is a person of high integrity, and his knowledge of healthcare and the political process will be invaluable to California’s hospitals.”

He replaces former CHA Senior Vice President Marty Gallegos, who left the association in July to accept a senior position at the Hospital Association of Southern California in Los Angeles.

CHA duties

In his new role, Emmerson will oversee CHA’s state-level legislative advocacy efforts. In accordance with state law, Emmerson will not lobby members of the Legislature for one year following the effective date of his resignation from the Senate. He will supervise the hospital association’s team of in-house and contract lobbyists. He also will provide political analysis and strategic guidance in the development of CHA’s public policy objectives.

An orthodontist by profession, Emmerson received his bachelor’s degree in history and political science from La Sierra University in Riverside. Emmerson was a practicing orthodontist for 26 years in Hemet (Riverside County) before being elected to the Legislature.

Earned CHAs Public Service Award

Emmerson was awarded CHA’s Public Service Award for his commitment to healthcare policies and issues.

Among his legislative achievements, Emmerson authored legislation to help combat poor oral health by requiring all school children to have an oral health assessment during kindergarten or their first year in school.


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